New York City Podiatrist

Posts for category: Foot Issues

By Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., P.L.L.C. & Associates
October 15, 2019
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Bunions  

Bunions are not just unattractive and unsightly, but depending on their size and the extent of joint damage they've caused, they can also Bunionsbe painful and affect everything from your ability to fit into your favorite shoes to participating in sports and physical activities. Fortunately, you don't have to live with bunion pain. Here at Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., FACFAS, P.L.L.C. & Associates in Manhattan, your podiatrists offer solutions for both bunions as well as a number of other foot and ankle conditions. Read on to learn more!

 

More about Bunions and Bunion Symptoms

One of the most common podiatric problems today, bunions are acquired foot deformities that manifest themselves as bumps at the base of big toes. There are several factors that can increase an individual's risk of developing bunions, and while anyone can get a bunion at any age, they are more common in women and the risk tends to develop with age.

Some of the most common symptoms include:

  • Bony protrusion/bump at the base of the big toe
  • Big toe slants towards the other toes away from the joint
  • Pain
  • Tenderness/redness/swelling
  • Corns and calluses from friction between the bunion and your shoes
  • Limited movement/mobility issues (advanced joint damage can also increase your risk for arthritis)
  • Your shoes feel tighter than normal or don't fit

 

What Causes Bunions?

There are a few things that can cause or increase the risk of bunions, some of which are preventable and others which are caused by factors like heredity or your foot type. Some other risk factors for developing bunions include:

  • Wearing high heels and tight, narrow shoes that crowd the toes
  • Spending a lot of time on your feet on an ongoing basis
  • Underlying joint injury or arthritis

 

Bunion Treatment in Manhattan

Like many other foot and ankle problems, bunions can generally be treated conservatively at first depending on the size and severity. The treatment options for bunions include:

  • Icing and pain relievers to relieve inflammation and discomfort
  • Splints
  • Arch supports or custom orthotics if you have flat feet or pronation
  • Supportive shoes
  • Splints and padding to align the joint and prevent chafing

Surgery to correct a bunion is rare, but is sometimes performed when conservative treatments are ineffective and there is extensive damage to the joint. You can also lower your risk of developing a bunion by wearing comfortable and supportive shoes, and discussing your risk factors with the podiatrist.

 

Find a Podiatrist in NYC

Whether you're a highly active individual and athlete, or you're just experiencing pain or having trouble fitting into your favorite shoes because of a bunion, we can help. Contact our Manhattan office today by calling (212) 628-4444 to schedule an appointment with one of our podiatrists.

By Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., P.L.L.C. & Associates
June 07, 2019
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Athlete's Foot  

One of the most common foot conditions that athletically inclined patients report is athlete’s foot. Not only is it super inconvenient, but it’s athlete's footalso an embarrassing and unpleasant condition to deal with. Athlete’s foot recurs often because patients continue to expose their feet to the same fungus that causes it. Find out how to properly treat your athlete’s foot with the help of a podiatrist at Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., F.A.C.F.A.S., P.L.L.C. & Associates in New York City.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?
The official term for athlete’s foot is tinea pedis, and it is a fungal infection that ravages the top layer of skin on the surface of your feet. It is referred to as athlete’s foot because it often affects people who exercise often or participate in sports that cause their feet to get sweaty. However, patients who just shower in public places (like gyms) or use public swimming pools can also struggle with the condition. Additionally, it can be passed from one person to another if you share socks, shoes, towels, or sheets.

Downsides of Athlete’s Foot
Athlete’s foot comes with a number of downsides that would prompt you to seek medical assistance from your New York City podiatrist as soon as possible. Those include:

- A strong, funky smell when you take your shoes or socks off.
- Scaly rashes on the feet.
- Itchiness or a burning sensation.
- Skin flaking and cracking.
- Toenail fungus (yellowing and thickening of the nail bed) if the condition advances.

Treating Athlete’s Foot
Since the cause of athlete’s foot (in most cases) is a fungus called Trichophyton‎, an anti-fungal agent is necessary to get rid of the symptoms. This medication may come in the form of foot cream, powder, or spray. You must apply it daily as prescribed to get results. Your podiatrist may also prescribe an oral medication to hasten the treatment process, which could take a few weeks.

Getting Help for Your Feet
If you have been dealing with a persistent and uncomfortable case of athlete’s foot, seek the help of our New York City office. Call (212) 628-4444 today to schedule a visit with a foot doctor who can provide you with superior foot care!

By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
January 31, 2019
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Bunion  

When bunions begin to interfere with your life, it may be time to consider surgery. The podiatrists at  Kenneth R. Meisler, DPM, & Associates in New York City, NY, perform bunion surgery and diagnose and treat conditions that affect the feet and ankles.

Should I consider bunion surgery?

Bunion surgery is recommended if conservative treatment doesn't ease your pain. Although orthotics, taping your feet and buying roomier shoes can be helpful, these measures won't eliminate the bunion and may not completely relieve your painful symptoms.

Your foot doctor may suggest surgery if your bunion prevents you from carrying out your usual daily activities. If you've stopped exercising, avoid doing anything that involves walking and spend too much time thinking about your pain, it may be time to consider bunion surgery.

Bunion surgery may also be helpful if your bunion is getting larger and more painful, you can't move your toe, or your condition has begun to cause pain in other parts of your body. For example, if you change the way you walk due to pain in your foot, you might experience knee, hip or back pain.

How will bunion surgery help me?

During surgery, your New York City, NY, podiatrist will realign the joint, remove excess tissue, and repair tendons and ligaments. If portions of bone are removed during surgery, your procedure may also involve attaching pins, screws or metal plates to bones. In some cases, your foot doctor may recommend fusing the bones in your toe or mid-foot.

What happens after bunion surgery?

Bunion surgery is usually performed on an outpatient basis. After you're released from the recovery room, you'll need to take it easy at home. You may wear a boot and use crutches for a few weeks, depending on the type of surgery. A foot brace and special shoes will help keep your joint in the best position for healing in the weeks following your procedure. Most people can resume driving after about six weeks, although it will take about two months until you can resume your normal activities. Your foot doctor may recommend physical therapy to strengthen your foot and ankle muscles and improve range of motion.

Bunion surgery offers an effective option if the quality of your life has declined due to your bunions. Call the podiatrists at  Kenneth R. Meisler, DPM, & Associates in New York City, NY, at (212) 628-4444 to schedule an appointment.

By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
July 12, 2018
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Bunions  

BunionsIs it about time you had bunion surgery? Although bunion pain can often be eased with other treatments, surgery may be the best option in some cases. The podiatrists at Kenneth R Meisler, DPM, & Associates in New York City, NY, provide a range of bunion treatments, including surgery.

Do I need bunion surgery?

You may be able to relieve or reduce your pain and slow the progression of your bunions by avoiding high heels and tight shoes, taping your feet, or wearing night splints or orthotics to realign your feet. Although these measures can be helpful, they can't reverse bunions. Surgery offers the only way to remove the bunion and end your pain. Bunion surgery may be recommended if you have:

  • Severe Pain: Does pain keep you off your feet and interfere with your usual activities? Although surgery is helpful, it's usually only recommended when more conservative measures are no longer helpful. If bunions make walking very difficult, prevent you from exercising, affect your job or keep you from participating in activities and events you've always enjoyed, you may be a good candidate for surgery.
  • Big Toe Creep: As your bunion worsens, your big toe may lean toward your other toes. Overlapping toes can make shoe shopping even more difficult and may cause corns and calluses that only add to your pain. Surgery will not only remove your bunion, but realign the joint, eliminating toe overlapping.
  • Inflammation: Ice and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen can be very helpful in reducing swelling and stiffness in your joint, but the medications might not be so effective when inflammation becomes a chronic problem. At this stage, bunion surgery may be the only effective treatment.

What happens during bunion surgery?

Your New York City podiatrist will recommend bunion surgery based on your symptoms and the severity of your condition. Surgery generally involves removing the bump, improving the alignment of the bones in the joint and removing excess tissue. Repair of tendons and ligaments may also be necessary. Bunion surgery is usually performed on an out-patient basis.

Would you like to find out if bunion surgery can help you? Call podiatrists at Kenneth R Meisler, DPM, & Associates in New York City, NY, at (212) 628-4444 to schedule your appointment.

By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
October 13, 2017
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Hammertoe  

One common foot issue that often prompts patients to visit the podiatrist is hammertoe. Hammertoe is a foot condition that is not only painful, but also embarrassing for patients who want to wear certain types of shoes and show off their feet. Learn more about what causes hammertoe and how it can be resolved at your podiatrist’s office.

What Is a Hammertoe?

The muscles of your toe help keep it in proper alignment so that it lies straight, the same way that your fingers look when you lay them out on a table. But in some cases, the joints in the toe become weakened, causing the top end of the toe to bend forward. This is called hammertoe—it usually happens to one or all of the middle three toes of the foot. In some cases the hammertoe is flexible, meaning that the toe can be manually bent back up into position, but in other cases it is rigid and can’t be adjusted. Hammertoe makes it difficult or even impossible to comfortably wear and walk in everyday shoes.

What Causes Hammertoe?

Hammertoe is most commonly caused by wearing bad shoes for extended periods of time. It is a problem often found in women because they like to wear attractive high heels that do unfortunate things to their feet. The design of many high heeled shoes causes the feet and toes to push up against the rigid front and bend them into the shape of a hammertoe. In some cases, people are more prone to hammertoe due to genetics or because of medical condition, like diabetes.

Treatments for Hammertoe

The treatment plan of choice for hammertoe is a combination of foot exercises, physical therapy and custom­made orthotic shoes or inserts. Placing a splint on the affected toe can also help it heal back into its correct position. If the area is painful, your podiatrist may also administer cortisone injections. In the case of rigid hammertoe, where you lose the ability to move the toe up or down, surgery may be necessary to fix the joint.

Hammertoe is an embarrassing foot problem, but the good news is that it can be corrected or relieved in most cases. It is best treated when you catch it in its early stages, so make an appointment with your podiatrist at the first signs of a bending toe.