New York City Podiatrist

Posts for: March, 2017

By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
March 16, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Odor  

No one likes smelly shoes; here are some fast and easy ways to eliminate shoe odors.

Sometimes our day just wouldn’t be complete without our morning runs; however, sweating and active feet can often cause some rather unpleasant shoe odors. You don’t even have to be athletic to deal with this problem. Even just wearing the same shoes all day can cause this embarrassing issue. If you’ve started to notice an unpleasant smell coming from your shoes, there are ways to combat this problem without needing to toss them out.

  1. Use a newspaper: After wearing your shoes all day be sure to put newspaper in them immediately after taking them off. Even if you haven’t exercised in your shoes, your feet can still sweat. Absorb some of the odor­producing sweat by putting newspapers in your shoes. Leave the paper in until you’re ready to wear them, and you’ll be amazed at how fresh they still smell.
  2. Put them in the freezer or outside: While this sounds like an unusual method, putting your shoes in the freezer is a highly effective way to kill the bacteria that cause shoe odors (the bacteria is no match for the extreme cold). However, before you just toss your shoes into the freezer, it’s best to put them in a plastic bag first so you don’t contaminate your freezer and its contents. Leave the shoes inside overnight, then and take them out and let them thaw a bit before wearing. And if you happen to live in a climate where the temperature regularly drops below freezing at night, putting the shoes in a paper bag and leaving them out for the night isn’t a bad idea either!
  3. Create your own odor­killing powder: Baking soda is a miracle agent that can remove odors from just about anything, so why not your shoes? You don’t have to spend a ton of money on odor­fighting products when you can make your very own powder with things you can easily find in your kitchen. Mix three tablespoons of baking soda with one tablespoon of cornstarch, and then add a couple drops of your favorite essential oil before mixing everything together. Sprinkle the powder into your shoes and let it sit overnight. Just be sure to dump out the powder before wearing them.

Follow these handy tips, and your shoes will smell brand new again. Don’t just shove your shoes in the closet after a long day, deodorize them to keep your shoes smelling fresh and clean!


By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
March 02, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Pediatric Podiatry  

Monitoring your child's foot growth and health is an invaluable part of preparing for their future.

Parents have a lot to worry about ­ from diet to exercise to interaction with peers, their children's health is a constant concern. While their kids' feet might not be at the top of most parents' priority list, it's a vital part of their development. Remember these tips:

Choose quality

Above all else, it is imperative to be sure your growing child is wearing the proper shoes. Their bones are still very flexible and need to be positioned properly in their footwear. Don't wait for them to complain about discomfort ­ often the contortion of their feet happens so gradually that neither you nor your child may realize it.

This is also true of athletic shoes ­ they should be comfortable and offer proper support for the type of activity your child will be doing. Inquire at your podiatrist's office about their brand recommendations.

Kids outgrow shoes fast

All parents know that feeling: your child has outgrown yet another pair of shoes. Experts advise that younger children's feet tend to grow faster. Therefore, toddlers will generally go up in size every two to three months. By the time your child is three years old, he or she will likely stay in the same size for about six months. Up until kids are in their early teens, parents can expect to replace the children's shoes at least once, if not twice, ­ a year.

No bare feet outdoors

Childhood memories often include the feeling of running through the fresh grass in bare feet, but doctors caution against this idyllic rite of passage. Sharp, dirty objects on the ground may be discovered the hard way ­by stepping on them. Not only are they painful, but deep puncture wounds can harbor harmful bacteria, including tetanus.

Talk to your podiatrist if you have any questions or concerns about your child's foot or ankle health.