New York City Podiatrist

Posts for: February, 2018

By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
February 20, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: High Ankle Sprain  

High ankle sprains are uncommon, but treatable with patience and diligent care. Read on to understand why these injuries are especially irregular:

A sprain may not be as serious as a broken bone, but it can be every bit as painful and inconvenient. This is especially true of a high ankle sprain, which is fairly uncommon but typically takes longer to heal than other sprains, making them a dreaded injury for athletes.

What is a high ankle sprain?

High ankle sprains, sometimes called syndesmotic sprains, affect the ligaments connecting the tibia and fibula bones in the lower leg. These are considered "high" in relation to where sprains usually occur; high ankle sprains actually happen above the ankle and are a result of an outward twisting (rather than the inward rotation seen in lateral ankle sprains). These injuries are most often seen in sports that involve "cutting in" ­ football, roller derby, pro wrestling, track and ice hockey, for example.

Treatment

In most cases, the well­known and highly effective RICE technique will be implemented:

  • Rest - Staying off of the affected leg as much as possible is essential
  • Ice - Applying ice packs to the area will help keep swelling down
  • Compression - This may involve wrapping with a bandage at home or a doctor immobilizing the area with a cast
  • Elevation - The leg should be propped up to the level of the heart. This promotes adequate circulation

Healing from high ankle sprains is dependent on the damage to the ligaments and can take anywhere from a few weeks to several months. Some of these sprains are found to be "unstable" and may require surgery. In most cases, regardless of the injury's severity, patients will use crutches to avoid putting weight on the ankle.

The ultimate goal in treating any sprain is to avoid loss of motion and scar tissue buildup. Your podiatrist will be able to evaluate the damage caused by your high ankle sprain and treat it accordingly.


By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
February 13, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Callus  

You can get a callus on just about any surface of your body, but it most frequently occurs in places where there is a lot of friction to the skin. Your feet are most susceptible to calluses because you wear tight shoes around them for the better part of your day. In many cases, a callus is merely an annoyance, but there are cases when it can become a problem.

What Is a Callus?

A callus is a build­up of toughened skin that happens when an area of the foot continually comes in contact into a rough surface. The friction causes layers of dead skin to form until a noticeable bump develops—it’s a natural reaction of the body to protect itself from injury, but unfortunately can lead to other problems. Podiatrists often find calluses on the bottom of the feet or on the toes.

Why Do Calluses Form?

Foot calluses almost always form because of pressure from the shoes that you wear as well as walking very often. Athletes usually develop calluses because of their high levels of activity—they frequently run, jump and make sudden motions while wearing tennis shoes that aren’t always ideal for their needs. Women often develop calluses on their toes and the sides of their feet from wearing pumps to work that constantly rub up against their skin. Some are soft and caused by too much sweat and moisture in the shoes (another issue that affects athletes).

When a Callus Becomes Problematic...

A callus is usually considered a minor cosmetic annoyance to the feet, but there are cases when it can become problematic. Without proper treatment, they can become inflamed, ulcerated or infected over time. Calluses that become ulcers can put the foot or toes at serious risk if it isn’t cleaned and disinfected properly. Allowing calluses to grow to a certain size can also make it impossible to wear or walk in everyday shoes.

When foot or toe calluses become a problem, treatments should be explored with a podiatrist. Common solutions include removing the callus with a scalpel and administering what is called a salicyclic acid patch to heal the skin. Your podiatrist may also prescribe orthotic shoes or inserts to stop the progression of calluses and prevent them from coming back. If you have callused toes or feet, call your doctor to discuss a custom treatment plan.