Sports Podiatry Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
What to Expect Before & After Bunion Surgery
By Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., P.L.L.C. & Associates
May 26, 2020
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunion Surgery  

Bunions could be painless, but they could also be excruciatingly painful. Although most people find relief from bunion pain with home remedies and conservative treatments, others, unfortunately, don’t. Here at Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., FACFAS, P.L.L.C. & Associates in New York City, NY, we only suggest bunion surgery when nonsurgical and conservative treatments fail to ease bunion symptoms. The procedure corrects the deformed area of your affected foot.

How to Prepare for Bunion Surgery

You will have to undergo several medical exams so that your podiatrist can check your general health to ensure that you’re medically fit to undergo bunion surgery. You’ll likewise need to take a break from your medications several days before the procedure, particularly if you’re taking blood-thinners. Bunion surgery is typically performed on an outpatient basis so you can head home several hours following your surgery and once the anesthetic’s effects have worn off.

It will be up to your podiatrist to decide on how long you shouldn’t drink or eat anything prior to your operation. Make absolutely certain to follow all the prep instructions of your podiatrist in New York City, NY, to avoid potential complications from the bunion surgery.

Recovering Well from Bunion Removal Surgery

Partial recovery will take approximately a month or two, but complete recovery will take about four up to six months. You will be wearing a surgical cast or boot for the first two to three weeks after the procedure to safeguard the surgery site. You also need to keep your stitches dry as much as possible. Likewise, your podiatrist will teach you exercises to help strengthen your lower leg and foot.

Once your boot or cast has been removed, it will be replaced with a brace to give proper support to your foot as it heals. You must also be careful of placing pressure on your foot so you’ll need to use crutches when moving around. You can resume driving after one or two weeks or when your podiatrist gives you the go signal.

Expect some swelling on the surgery site for a couple of months. To help reduce inflammation and speed up healing, apply ice a couple of times daily, careful to avoid the stitches. Always wear shoes with sufficient space and don’t wear high-heeled shoes for a minimum of six months following bunion surgery.

For More Information on Bunion Surgery, Contact Us

Call (212) 628-4444 to schedule your consultation here at Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., FACFAS, P.L.L.C. & Associates in New York City, NY.

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