New York City Podiatrist

Posts for tag: Running

By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
April 19, 2017
Category: Foot Care

Find out how to prevent and treat running injuries.

If athletes could have it their way, they would enjoy every mile of their run without experiencing any pain, discomfort or soreness. While this running injuriessounds ideal, it’s sadly not the reality we live in. With uneven and sometimes rough and rocky terrain, runners face a variety of conditions that are tough on their feet and ankles and can cause serious issues. Here are some of the most common running injuries we see and what you can do about them.

Achilles Tendinitis

This condition often occurs because of repeated stress or overuse and affects the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscles to the back of the heel. When a runner develops Achilles tendinitis, this means the tendon is irritated and often stiff.

  • Risk Factors: This condition is usually the result of a sudden increase in training, which can put unnecessary pressure on your calves. While it’s great to push yourself during your workout, you must create realistic goals to prevent injuries.
  • Care: You will want to rest whenever you can and elevate your foot. Apply ice for 10 to 20 minutes a day, several times a day. Also, perform strengthening and stretching exercises like heel drops, and opt for low-­impact cardio instead.
  • Workout Impact: If you notice pain during or after your run you need to halt all activities until your injury is better. This is certainly not a condition that you want to continue to work out with. If you stop your workouts while the condition is still minor, you will have a faster healing time than someone who continues to work out through the pain.

Stress Fractures

Repeated stress and overtraining are the two main causes of these fractures, which can be caused by increasing your workout intensity or duration too fast. They are one of the most serious conditions that runners face.

  • Risk Factors: However, those who’ve been running longer are less at risk for stress fractures than those who just started. Women are also more prone to stress fractures than men, often due to a lack of sufficient calorie intake or other nutritional deficits.
  • Care: Stay off your foot until you can walk without pain. Once this happens, you can slowly incorporate jogging into your routine. You can use OTC pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain and swelling. Talk to your podiatrist about whether you may need crutches.
  • Workout Impact: Do not workout while you have a stress fracture. You should take anywhere from eight to 16 weeks away from your workouts. This, of course, will depend on the severity of your fracture. Again, opt for swimming or other low-­impact sports in the meantime.

If you ever experience severe or chronic pain in your feet or ankles it’s important to contact your podiatrist right away. While at-­home care can certainly alleviate your symptoms, if your symptoms affect your day­to­day activities, then it’s time to seek medical attention.

By Dr. Kenneth Meisler and Associates
February 02, 2017
Category: Foot Care

Consider the health of your feet the next time you purchase your running shoes.

If you are an avid runner, nothing sounds better than lacing up your shoes and spending the day outdoors. However, do you think about the proper running shoeshealth of your feet while you are running your favorite trails? Are you considering how much protection your feet are getting or the stability they need while you pound the pavement? Our feet and ankles play a major role in our ability to enjoy active endeavors like running. Therefore, when it’s time to pick out a new pair of running shoes, here are some tips you should follow.

Figure out your foot type

Do you have flat feet or high arches? When you go in to try on running shoes, go to an athletic store where specialists and experts can help you choose the proper running shoes to fit your foot shape. By choosing shoes based on the arch of your foot, you can easily prevent certain injuries.

Do you pronate?

How your foot hits the ground while you move will also affect the type of shoes you purchase. Those with flat feet often overpronate, which means that the foot rolls severely inward every time your foot hits the ground. Whenever the foot rolls inward it causes pain and strain to the foot. By going to a specialty running store you can talk to someone who will be able to determine whether you pronate so you get the best running shoes for your feet.

By a half size up

This might sound a bit odd, but did you know that your feet actually swell while you run? Therefore, if your shoes just fit or even fit a little snug, this can cause blisters and other foot problems due to overcrowded toes. In order to combat swollen feet, it’s not a bad idea to go up a half size in your shoes than you normally would.

Know when to replace your old shoes

No one likes to say goodbye to their old running shoes, especially if a lot of great memories were formed and races were won while wearing them; however, shoes don’t last forever and the longer you wear worn­out shoes the more damaging it could be for your feet. A good rule of thumb is to replace your shoes every 300 to 500 miles.

If you have any questions about what running shoe is best for you, call your podiatrist today!

By Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., P.L.L.C. & Associates
May 02, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Runners   Running   Foot Pain   Exercise  

Runners: Stay in Shape while Protecting Your Feet from Harm 

With summer just around the corner, you may be jumping back into your running routine to get into shape. While running may be beneficial to maintaining your health and remaining in shape, it does not always go easy on your feet.  The consistent pounding of your foot on hard pavement can lead to pain and other foot and ankle complications.  However, by taking proper care of your feet you can ensure the health of your feet while maintaining a healthy, active life style.  By understanding the aches and pains of running, and proper preventive measures, you can better prepare your lower extremities for running and prevent heel pain in New York City.   Protecting Runners Feet
 

Understanding Your Aches and Pains of Running 

Even with the best preparation, aches and pains may be inevitable as a result of a new running regimen.  If the pain subsides with slow, easy exercise you may continue, but if it gets worse, stop the activity and rest.  If the pain persists, seek attention from Dr. Meisler, our New York City area podiatrist, immediately.
 
One of the most common running pains is known as runner’s knee, which is all around knee pain commonly caused by excessive rolling in and down of the foot.  Orthotics prescribed by our podiatrist in New York City is the best way to alleviate the problem.  Occasionally, rubber pads in the arch of the show may help as well. 
 
Another common running pain is shin splints, which are painful and appear at the front and inside of the leg.  Running on hard surfaces causes shin splints, in addition to over striding, muscle imbalance or overuse.  Treatment includes changing your running technique or an insertion of an orthotic device in your shoe. 
 

Some running tips to remember include: 

  • Start easy and build up your distances slowly
  • Don’t forget to stretch regularly
  • Use sport specific shoes
  • Fit your shoes with the socks that you plan to wear during your running

When to Visit Our New York City Podiatrist

It is important to establish a relationship with your podiatrist when you are a beginning jogger or runner and before starting an exercise program.  Dr. Meisler will examine your feet and identify potential problems, discuss conditioning, prescribe an orthotic device that fits into a running shoe, if needed, and recommend the best style of footwear for your feet.  Frequent runners should visit the podiatrist regularly to check for potential stress on the lower extremities. 
 
Regardless of your age, you should visit our podiatrist in New York City, NY before starting any exercise routine.  It is important to stay on top of your feet and not cause pain or injury.  Give your feet a break and visit our office for any problems or issues that may arise while running.
By Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., P.L.L.C. & Associates
October 15, 2013
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Marathon Training   Running  

marathon runningWhether you’re training for your very first marathon or preparing for your tenth, it’s important to begin your training program on the right foot.  A lack of experience coupled with the repetitive impact placed on the feet and ankles during a long run can produce enough stress to cause hairline fractures and other debilitating foot injuries.

Many foot problems seen in marathoners are caused by the repetitive pounding over the months of long-distance running. In some people injury is triggered by the abnormal foot biomechanics and in others it is because of poor training. During a 10-mile run, the feet make about 15,000 strikes, at a force of three to four times the body's weight. Even if you have perfect foot mechanics, injuries and pain are often unavoidable with this amount of stress.  

To prevent injury during training, it’s important to pay close attention to your feet.  When increasing mileage, avoid doing so too quickly. The increased forced can make your feet more susceptible to stress fractures.

Basic tips for training include:

  • Follow a training schedule that is appropriate for your experience level
  • Start easy and increase your mileage slowly
  • Stretch and warm up properly to reduce strain on muscles, tendons and joints
  • Choose appropriate footwear based on your foot structure, function, body type, running environment and training regimen
  • Never ignore pain. If the pain gets worse with reduced exercise and rest, stop training and visit your podiatrist

Aside from stress fractures which often occur from overtraining, additional foot problems you may experience include:

  • Toenail problems, including ingrown and fungus
  • Heel pain, such as plantar fasciitis
  • Achilles tendon and calf pain
  • Toe pain, such as bunions
  • Shin splints

Before you start training, Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., P.L.L.C. & Associates recommend visiting a podiatrist for a complete evaluation of your lower extremities.  Our New York office will examine your feet and identify potential problems, discuss training tactics, prescribe an orthotic device that fits into a running shoe (if needed), and recommend the best style of footwear for your feet to allow for injury free training all the way up to your race day. It is especially important to come in for an exam if you have already started training and are experiencing foot or ankle pain.  

Training for a marathon is hard work. It takes time and dedication.  At Kenneth R. Meisler, D.P.M., P.L.L.C. & Associates we offer special interest and expertise working with marathoners to ensure good foot health throughout your entire training program to help you achieve your goals.